Beit Midrash

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39 Lessons
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    Va'era

    The Search for a True Jew

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | 2 Shvat 5784
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    The Tenth of Tevet

    A Fast Day on a Friday!?

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | 10 Tevet 5784
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    Praying

    Fulfilling G-d's – and Man's – Decrees

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | 11 Cheshvan 5784
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    D'varim

    It All Becomes Clear in the End!

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | Av 3 5783
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    Matot-Masei

    Don't Get Stuck, Get a Move On!

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | 25 Tamuz 5783
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    Balak

    Was Bil'am Jewish?

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | 11 Tamuz 5783
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    3 min
    Behar

    Behar: To The Summit!

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | 5783 Iyar 20
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    Vayikra

    The Secret Love

    ...There are things that must be kept in Sod (Secret), and if someone reveals them, he thus abuses and wastes their greatness. One who has no secrets is one who is shallow and external - but 'Israel was redeemed from Egypt in the merit of not having revealed their inner secrets' (Midrash Tehillim 114,1)...

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | Nissan 2 5783
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    The Happiness in Purim

    What Mordechai Discovered When He Returned to Shushan

    Scholars of the Bible and Rabbinic writings know that the Scroll of Esther took place at roughly the same time as the beginning of the Book of Ezra...During that period, only a small minority of the Jewish People moved back to the Land: just over 43,000 people. The others did not heed the prophetic call, and preferred to remain with the fleshpots and other enjoyments of the exile... But this raises a well-known question: Why did Mordechai HaYehudi, the great righteous man, remain in Shushan, when he had a chance to return to our Holy Land and rebuild Jerusalem and the Holy Temple? Actually, we read in the Book of Ezra (2,2), that Mordechai was one of the leaders of those who did return to the Land of Israel – which means that he later returned to Shushan! Why did he do this?...

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | Adar 10 5783
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    The Happiness in Purim

    What Mordechai Discovered When He Returned to Shushan

    Scholars of the Bible and Rabbinic writings know that the Scroll of Esther took place at roughly the same time as the beginning of the Book of Ezra...During that period, only a small minority of the Jewish People moved back to the Land: just over 43,000 people. The others did not heed the prophetic call, and preferred to remain with the fleshpots and other enjoyments of the exile... But this raises a well-known question: Why did Mordechai HaYehudi, the great righteous man, remain in Shushan, when he had a chance to return to our Holy Land and rebuild Jerusalem and the Holy Temple? Actually, we read in the Book of Ezra (2,2), that Mordechai was one of the leaders of those who did return to the Land of Israel – which means that he later returned to Shushan! Why did he do this?...

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | Adar 10 5783
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    Tetzave

    The Secret to Eternal Life

    Ever since the dawn of time, people have pursued the goal of eternal life. The ancient Egyptians, for example, mummified their bodies, in the belief that this would grant them continuity from one world to another. Even today, many contribute to various Torah or kindness organizations in order to memorialize their loved ones... On a simple level, the aspiration for eternity stems from a positive place in one's soul: the striving to be like our eternal Creator. If so, when we consider the other levels of G-d's creation, we will realize that we are not very close to reaching this goal...

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | Adar 8 5783
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    Beshalach

    Automatic Holiness!

    ...We all understand that the mitzvot are meant to bring us to spiritual heights. Some of our mitzvot are clearly "spiritual," and it is easy to see how they help a person rise up in Divine service and closeness. But there are also mitzvot that appear to be "materialistic," of which it is hard to see the spiritual benefits. On a superficial level, it is hard to see the mitzvot of working, building, and settling the Land as bringing about a higher level of spirituality. After all, people do these very same things on their parcels of land throughout the world! Perhaps we can see spirituality in synagogues and other holy sites, where people come to pray and the like – but what of regular pieces of earth? Where is the sanctity there?...

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | Shvat 12 5783
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    Toldot

    This Culture Is Not for Us

    ...In recent generations, [the] struggle [between Yaakov and Esav] has taken on a new and even more complex nature, and it is important that we not be misled by it. Today, the culture leading the world is Western culture, and the morality leading the world is Western morality. This culture and morality are upgraded versions of X-ianity, with a more refined and pretty face. Many Jews who encounter this Western morality find in it an echo of Judaism, and are inclined to think that it is an "upgraded Judaism," Heaven forbid...

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | Heshvan 30 5783
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    Vayera

    There's No Such This as "I Used to Be Religious"

    There is a certain difficulty that every teacher (and parent) faces: You work hard, try to educate and advance your child, and very often you feel that nothing is moving; you feel failure...

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | Heshvan 17 5783
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    Noach

    The Good, the Bad, and the Perfect Marriage

    Once upon a time, a man came to see a marriage counselor, and began to complain: "My wife is too passive and quiet. I do all the cooking and cleaning, and she barely helps out. And I even have to do all the talking – if I don't start a conversation, you'd be able to hear a pin drop in our house. I always have to initiate and start discussions. I can't go on this way!"...

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | Heshvan 3 5783
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    Vayelech

    Who's Pulling the Strings

    This week's Torah portion reveals that the entirety of Jewish history, with all its uplifting joys and terrible hardships, was determined in advance.

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | Tishrei 5 5783
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    Nitzavim

    Connecting Teshuva & the Final Redemption

    Rav Yaakov Moshe Harlop, a venerated student of Rav Kook and one of the heads of Yeshivat Merkaz HaRav after his teacher's death, often spoke of the contemporary phenomenon of baalei teshuvah, returnees to Torah observance. The problem was that this was far from a widespread trend at the time – 80 years ago, give or take – and his students wondered what he was referring to. On the contrary, it seemed that society in the Land of Israel was deteriorating towards secularism...

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | Elul 27 5782
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    Shoftim

    How to Join the Ranks of the Greatest People in History

    A wise man once said: "The history of the world is actually the history of the great men of the world." He meant, of course, that the great people are those who move the historic processes and determine their countries' agenda. There is much truth to this saying, but it must be understood correctly – and if it is, that will determine whether we will end up as one of these "great men," or rather trail far behind them...

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | Elul 6 5782
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    The Month of Elul

    Elul in Our Generation of Redemption

    A man once came to his rabbi with a complaint: "Rabbi, I work very hard and make hardly any money." The rabbi said, "I can give you a higher paying job, and it's also very easy work." The man jumped with joy and said, "I'll take it!" The rabbi said, "Great. Take this hammer and swing it up and down, over and over at a set pace, and I'll pay you per hour." The man said, "Sounds both easy and profitable," and immediately got to work....

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | Elul 6 5782
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    Re'e

    Stop Working Just for the Pay!

    Once when I was serving reserve duty (miluim) in the IDF, I was sitting in the synagogue tent learning some Torah, when I happened to overhear some tidbits of conversation between two of my buddies. One of them was Torah-observant, the other one not yet. Out of the corner of my ear I heard the latter ask, "Tell me, how do you live with the fact that I can enjoy the world to the hilt, while you're saddled with all those Torah restrictions?" The religious one gave him a quick, short answer: "You enjoy This World, while I'll enjoy the World to Come!" Cringe.

    Rabbi Netanel Yossifun | Av 29 5782
את המידע הדפסתי באמצעות אתר yeshiva.org.il