Yeshiva.org.il - The Torah World Gateway

Women in Judaism

Text size

  • Women, Kiddush and Bracha Acharonah
    "I was told years ago that I should make kiddush before I eat Shabbos morning. Recently, someone told me that this was not necessary. What should I do?" "I recited the after bracha on the cake, but forgot to include al hagafen for the wine I drank. I didn’t know whether I was supposed to recite the bracha acharonah again, in order to say the al hagafen, or whether I should do nothing."
  • Women's level in serving Hashem
    Throughout the centuries, the Jewish women had a strong faith in God, a faith which brought the redemption of the nation.
  • Looking for the Lost Mothers
    “Fathers and sons” may be a good name for our parasha. Mothers and daughters are somehow missing.
  • The Sanctity of the New Moon
    On the Sabbath before the New Moon there is a custom to announce the day (or days) of the week on which it will fall, and to recite a blessing, "that God should renew this coming month for us and the entire Jewish people for goodness and blessing."
  • Women, Precepts, and Perimeters
    As a rule, women are obligated to observe the commandments of the Torah just like men, with the exception of positive time-bound precepts. Yet, if a woman wishes to voluntarily perform a positive time-bound commandment, she receives merit for this.
  • The Woman and Her Commandments
    Essentially, men and women are created equal and both are graced by the divine image through which every human being is created. Likewise, the unalterable chosenness of the Jewish people and their innate holiness embraces men and women alike.
  • A Woman's Obligation to Pray
    According to most authorities, women are no less obligated to pray than men. Therefore, they must pray “Amida” in the morning and the afternoon (“Shacharit” and “Mincha”). The evening Amida prayer (“Maariv”), on the other hand, is voluntary.
את המידע הדפסתי באמצעות אתר yeshiva.org.il
;