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Beit Midrash Jewish Laws and Thoughts Tzitzit & Tefillin

Blended and Synthetic Tzitzis

Is a silk Talis Kosher? What is the basis of the halachic controversy whether one may have a talis koton made of rayon? I have a talis koton that says that it is made of a cotton-polyester blend. Do I recite a brocha when I put it on?
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Question #1: Silk Talis
"I grew up in a conservative home, and, prior to my bar mitzvah, I was given a ‘bar mitzvah set’ which included tefillin and a silk talis. I have since discovered that the tefillin were completely non-kosher. Must I assume that there is a problem with the talis also, since it is made from silk?"

Question #2: Prefers Rayon
"What is the basis of the halachic controversy whether one may have a talis koton made of rayon?"

Question #3: Blended Tzitzis
"I have a talis koton that says that it is made of a cotton-polyester blend. Do I recite a brocha when I put it on?"

Answer
In parshas Ki Seitzei, the Torah teaches the mitzvah obligating Jewish men to tie tzitzis to the four corners of their garments. The topic for today’s discussion is: What type of material are we obligated to use in the mitzvah of tzitzis? Do the corners of all garments require one to place tzitzis? As we will see, the question involves both an issue of Torah law and of rabbinic law.

Only wool or linen?
The Gemara (Menachos 39b) records an early dispute whether the Torah’s mitzvah of tzitzis applies only to garments made of sheep’s wool or linen. According to Rav Nachman, a four-cornered garment made of silk, cotton, or any material other than sheep’s wool or linen is not included, min hatorah, in the mitzvah of tzitzis. (For the balance of this article, "wool", without an adjective, will be used to mean specifically wool of sheep. The word tzemer in the Torah means only the wool of sheep, and, therefore, a blend of linen and wool processed from camels, llamas, rabbits, goats [such as cashmere or mohair] or other animals is not shatnez min hatorah [Kelayim 9:1]. A garment made of such a blend that contains no sheep’s wool is shatnez because of a rabbinic injunction.) According to Rav Nachman, in order to guarantee that people are careful to wear tzitzis there is a requirement to attach them to four-cornered garments made from other cloth, but it is only miderabbanan (Rambam, Hilchos Tzitzis 3:2).

All fibers are min hatorah
Rav Yehudah and Rava disagree with Rav Nachman, contending that, min hatorah, silk and all other fibers are obligated in mitzvas tzitzis (Menachos 39b). The Gemara notes that this dispute originates among the tanna’im, and that the dispute also affects whether other materials, such as silk, cashmere and mohair, are subject to the tumah of nega’im. According to Rav Nachman and the tanna with whom he sides, the telltale red or green blemishes of tzaraas make garments tamei only when they are made of either wool or linen. Should a garment made of silk, cotton, cashmere, mohair, or other cloth display red or green blemishes reminiscent of tzaraas, the garment remains tahor, since these materials are not susceptible to nega’im. However, according to Rav Yehudah and Rava, silk, cotton and other cloth are susceptible to the laws of tzaraas.

What is the halachah?
The Rambam (Hilchos Tzitzis 3:1,2) and the Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chayim 9:1) rule that only linen and wool require tzitzis min hatorah, and the Rambam (Hilchos Tumas Tzaraas 13:1,3) rules that only cloth made of linen and wool is affected by the laws of tzaraas. On the other hand, other authorities rule that all materials require tzitzis min hatorah, and this is the way the Rema rules (Orach Chayim 9:1). (These authorities would also hold that all garments are susceptible to tumas nega’im, but they do not discuss the laws of tumah and taharah because, unfortunately, they are not germane in our day.)

Is there any difference in halachah? After all, both approaches rule that one is required to put tzitzis on four-cornered garments made of cotton, silk or cashmere. What difference does it make whether the garment is obligated in the mitzvah min hatorah or miderabbanan? There can be several practical differences that result. The most obvious answer is that since it is exemplary for someone to fulfill a mitzvah min hatorah when he can, is it preferable to wear a garment made of wool over one made of cotton. For this reason, Rav Moshe Feinstein rules that one should wear a talis koton made of wool, even though it is more comfortable to wear a cotton talis koton in the summer, since one who wears a woolen talis koton thereby fulfills a mitzvah min hatorah, according to all opinions (Shu’t Igros Moshe, Orach Chayim 2:1). On the other hand, other prominent authorities followed the approach of the Rema, contending that an Ashkenazi who is uncomfortable wearing woolen tzitzis in the summer may wear a talis koton made of cotton.

Silk talis
At this point, we can address the first question asked above: "I grew up in a conservative home, and, prior to my bar mitzvah, I was given a ‘bar mitzvah set’ which included tefillin and a silk talis. I have since discovered that the tefillin were completely non-kosher. Must I assume that there is a problem with the talis also, since it is made of silk?"
The answer is that the fact that the garment or its tzitzis are made from silk does not present any halachic problem. There is another potential concern which we have, as yet, not discussed.

Special strings
The tzitzis threads must be spun with the intent that they will be used to fulfill the mitzvah of tzitzis. After completing the spinning, one takes several of these specially-spun threads and twists them together into a thicker string. This twisting is also performed lishmah. The authorities dispute whether attaching the tzitzis strings to the garment and tying them must also be performed lishmah. In practice, we are stringent (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim 14:2 and commentaries).

Many authorities contend that when manufacturing an item lishmah, one must articulate this intent (Rosh, Hilchos Sefer Torah, Chapter 3). This means that the person spinning or twisting the tzitzis must say that he/she is doing so, in order to make tzitzis for the sake of the mitzvah (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim 11:1 and Mishnah Berurah, ad locum).
The question about the silk talis is that we need to determine that the tzitzis tied to them were, indeed, made properly lishmah.

Polyester, rayon or nylon?
At this point, we can discuss whether the mitzvah of tzitzis applies to synthetic materials. In the last ninety years, mankind has successfully developed several fabrics that are lighter than cotton, and which some people find more comfortable to wear. The question is whether a four-cornered garment made from these materials is obligated in the mitzvah of tzitzis. Obviously, according to those who hold that only wool and linen are obligated in tzitzis min hatorah, these garments are not obligated min hatorah, and the question is whether there is an obligation miderabbanan. According to the Rema, who rules that all materials are obligated in tzitzis, the question might even be whether rayon, nylon or other polyester materials are obligated in tzitzis min hatorah.

Why should they not be? Answering this question requires its own introduction.

Tzitzis on leather ponchos?
Notwithstanding the conclusion that silk and other materials require tzitzis, a different passage of Gemara (Menachos 40b) assumes that leather garments are exempt from the mitzvah of tzitzis. The Gemara cites a dispute among amora’im regarding whether a garment made of material obligated in tzitzis, but whose corners are made of leather, is obligated in tzitzis. It also cites a dispute whether a garment made of leather whose corners are made of cloth is obligated in tzitzis. Rav and Rav Zeira contend that, in both instances, the main part of the garment is the determinant, meaning that a cloth garment with leather corners is obligated to have tzitzis tied to its corners, whereas a leather garment with cloth corners is absolved from the mitzvah of tzitzis. Rav Acha’i disputes with Rav and Rav Zeira, contending that the material comprising the corner determines whether the garment requires tzitzis. Clearly, all the amora’im are in agreement that a garment made completely from leather is exempt from tzitzis.

Why is hide outside?
Why is leather different from all the other materials mentioned that are obligated in tzitzis? We will need to answer this question and then see whether synthetic materials are treated like leather and absolved from the mitzvah of tzitzis, or whether they are like silk and the other materials that are obligated in the mitzvah of tzitzis.

I found two basic approaches to explain why leather is treated differently from other materials. One approach is that leather is not woven, but is cut to size, and that the mitzvah of tzitzis applies only to woven material. This approach is implied by several acharonim (Levush, Orach Chayim 10:4; Graz 10:7).

Nylon and tzitzis
I found several responsa which discuss whether synthetic materials are obligated in the mitzvah of tzitzis. In each case, the questioner "preferred" that the synthetic garment be obligated in the mitzvah. In other words, since one is rewarded for wearing tzitzis daily, the questioner was interested in fulfilling the mitzvah by wearing tzitzis that are on a four-cornered garment made of polyester, nylon or rayon, desiring to wear a cooler material than wool or cotton.

One responsum on the subject is authored by Rav Tzvi Pesach Frank (Shu’t Har Tzvi, Orach Chayim 1:9). He understands that leather is exempt from the mitzvah of tzitzis because it is not woven, and that any four-cornered garment that is not woven is exempt from tzitzis, whereas a woven four-cornered garment is obligated in tzitzis. He then notes that there are two types of nylon garments, one made from woven nylon thread, which he rules would be required to have tzitzis, and one made from sheets of nylon, which are not woven and therefore absolved from the mitzvah of tzitzis, just as leather is.

Disputing approaches
Other authorities reach a different conclusion, for the following reason. In a different context, several earlier authorities explain the distinction between leather and other materials in a different way. While discussing the minimum size that different types of garments need to be in order to contract tumah, the Mishnah (Keilim 27:1) rules that a leather item is not susceptible to becoming tamei unless it is a larger size than the halachic category called arig, which means woven material. In their commentaries on that Mishnah, the Rash and the Bartenura both explain that, were one to slice leather into very thin slices and weave them into a garment, the garment thereby produced still has the halachah of leather and not that of a woven garment. It appears that these authorities understand that the qualitative distinction between leather and woven materials is not the process of weaving, but something more basic.

Rav Moshe Feinstein explains that woven cloth means a material that is, in its natural state, fiber that would need to be spun into thread and then woven into cloth. Neither leather nor synthetics meet this definition. Rav Moshe contends that only that which is a fiber that can be woven into material is included under the category of arig for tumah purposes and in the obligation of tzitzis. As a result, Rav Moshe concludes that a four-cornered garment made from a synthetic material is, by definition, exempt from the mitzvah of tzitzis. Wearing tzitzis tied onto such a garment does not accomplish any mitzvah, and reciting a brocha prior to donning this garment is a brocha levatalah, one recited in vain. Furthermore, according to Rav Moshe, wearing such a garment on Shabbos might violate carrying, since the tzitzis are not part of the garment. (The details of this topic are beyond the scope of this article, but see the correspondence of the Shu’t Meishiv Davar 1:2 disputing with what is written in the Mishnah Berurah.)

The Rambam’s Commentary
In his commentary on the Mishnah in Keilim, the Rambam seems to explain the Mishnah in a way different from that of the Rash and the Bartenura. Nevertheless, Rav Moshe understands the Rambam to be presenting the same understanding of the topic as the Rash and the Bartenura, but that the Rambam was emphasizing a different point. This means that the principle established by Rav Moshe is, in his opinion, held by all early authorities, and therefore has the weight of the final halachah.

The Tzitz Eliezer and tzitzis
Rav Moshe’s approach is disputed by Rav Eliezer Yehudah Valdenberg (Shu’t Tzitz Eliezer 12:3), who disagrees with Rav Moshe’s understanding of the Rambam. Whereas Rav Moshe understands that the Rambam is explaining the difference between leather and woven materials the same way that the Rash and the Bartenura do, the Tzitz Eliezer explains the Rambam to be drawing the same distinction as do the Levush, the Graz and the Har Tzvi – that leather is not considered arig because it is not woven. As we mentioned above, in the opinion of these latter authorities, anything woven is obligated in the mitzvah of tzitzis. The Tzitz Eliezer understands that the Rambam is making the same distinction germane to what is considered arig concerning the laws of tumah. Since the later authorities accept this distinction, Rav Valdenberg concludes that four-cornered synthetic garments are obligated in tzitzis, and that those who are uncomfortable wearing other cloth may fulfill the mitzvah by wearing rayon or polyester tzitzis. Because there are early authorities who dispute this conclusion, namely the Rash and the Bartenura, Rav Valdenberg rules that those who wear these tzitzis should not recite a brocha when donning them.

Prefers rayon
At this point, we can address one of our opening questions: "What is the basis of the halachic controversy whether one may have a talis koton made of rayon?"
The answer is that it depends on why leather is exempt from tzitzis. If it is exempt because only woven fabrics are obligated in the mitzvah of tzitzis, then a rayon four-cornered garment is obligated in the mitzvah, and one fulfills the mitzvah by wearing it. On the other hand, if leather is exempt because only naturally fibrous materials are obligated in tzitzis, then rayon is exempt from tzitzis, and nothing is accomplished by tying tzitzis to a four-cornered rayon garment.

Metal clothing
This author would like to note another situation, although today uncommon, which should result from the dispute between Rav Pesach Frank and Rav Moshe. According to both approaches, if someone were to make a four-cornered garment from metal plating, the garment is exempt from the mitzvah of tzitzis. According to Rav Moshe, it would be exempt because it is not made from material that is naturally fibrous, whereas according to Rav Frank, it is exempt because it was not woven. However, as we see from chumash, metals can be made into filaments which are then woven into clothing. Is a four-cornered garment woven from metal filament obligated in tzitzis? According to Rav Frank, this garment should be obligated in tzitzis since it is woven, whereas, according to Rav Moshe, it should not, since this material is not naturally fibrous.

Blends
At this point, let us examine the last of our opening questions:

"I have a talis koton that says that it is made of a cotton-polyester blend. Do I recite a brocha when I put it on?"

When a thread is spun from a blend of fibers, the halachic status of the thread is determined by what composes most of the thread's fiber content and ignores the existence of other fibers inside the thread (Mishnah Kelayim 9:1). The minority of fiber is halachically bateil, or nullified, to the majority fiber content in the thread. Thus, threads spun from a mixture that is mostly cotton fiber with some linen fiber are considered cotton and may be woven in a woolen garment without creating a prohibition of shatnez. Similarly, a garment consisting of threads made of a blend of mostly mohair, including some sheep's wool fiber, that are woven or sewn with linen threads, is not shatnez and may be worn.

The same law is true regarding the mitzvah of tzitzis. A garment made of threads that are a blend that is mostly rayon or polyester fiber and includes cotton fiber will have the halachic status of a rayon garment and be exempt from tzitzis, according to Rav Moshe’s ruling. Of course, according to Rav Frank, this garment is obligated in the mitzvah of tzitzis.

Fringe benefits
Rav Hirsch notes that the root of the word tzitzis is to "sprout" or "blossom," a strange concept to associate with garments, which do not grow. He explains that the message of our clothing is extended, that is, sprouts and blossoms, by virtue of our tzitzis. The introduction of clothing to Adam and Chavah was to teach man that his destiny is greater than an animal's, and that his responsibility is to make all his decisions according to Hashem's laws, and not his own desires. Introducing tzitzis onto a Jew's garments reinforces this idea; we must act according to what Hashem expects. Thus, whether we are wearing, shopping for, examining or laundering tzitzis, we must remember our life's goal: fulfilling Hashem's instructions, not our own desires.

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This Shiur is published also at Rabbi Kaganof's site
Rabbi Yirmiyohu Kaganoff
Was the Rabbi of the Young Israel of Greater Buffalo, the Congregation Darchei Tzedek and also served as a dayan on the Beis Din of Baltimore. Now is a Rabbi in Neve Yaakov, Jerusalem. His Shiurim and Q&A can be found on his site: www.rabbikaganoff.com
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