Sign in | Register
 
 
 
Bookmark and Share RSS for this category Rss Search Options
Hello Guest, ( Login / register )


Tammuz 7, 5779

Swearwords


Rabbi Ari Shvat

Question:
Whats the source of the usage swearwords from point of view of Judaism?
The issue is that minister of Healthcare of Ukraine said swearwords are good for health. I don’t care what the whole word and science say, I listen to judaism only! here they made research and scientific proof.
http://bit.ly/2XF51Ed http://bit.ly/2Ja3Zb7, http://bit.ly/2XJ8O3g http://bit.ly/2Nv6VU4. http://bit.ly/2J9ls3y http://bit.ly/2J6MMzo http://bit.ly/327JDGY http://bit.ly/30ct5eX http://bit.ly/2NuUmrM http://bit.ly/2RRxp0e, http://bit.ly/30cvQgj. http://bit.ly/2xqa9wX

Answer:
The Rambam (Guide for the Perplexed, 3, 8) points out that there are no dirty words in Hebrew, and even the "bathroom words", which are universally used for foul language, in Hebrew, are all clean and innocent terms, simply borrowed for the bathroom context. Similarly, instead of writing "defiled", the Torah often writes "un-pure". This teaches the logical ideal, that it's undesirable to curse, swear or speak negatively. When someone vents his temper by yelling or cursing, he's simply losing control over his "free will", showing a shallow aspect of character, where he can't express himself verbally or sophisticatedly, but rather reverts immaturely to speak like an uneducated thug, all of which are very negative traits. Additionally, just as we stress modesty in dress, actions and even thoughts, and strictly prohibit any kind of pornography or sexual flaunting or objectifying of women, similarly, the rabbis decreed against speaking crudely and dirty, thus defiling the Godly trait of speech.


I want to ask a question related to this answer



Yeshiva.org.il
The Torah World Gateway